Harold Bawlzangya Racing

KDX 220 Hybrid Engine Build

I thought I finally had a 220 with this engine, but it didn’t quite work out the way I had hoped.  So I’m using most of that engine to get my 220.

After getting the regular bearings and seals out and removing the blind bearings, I’ve got the cases broken down:

CasesStripped (2)

 (click picture to enlarge)

CasesStripped (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

CasesStripped (1)

(click picture to enlarge)


I let the cases soak in a bucket of diesel for a couple of days while I worked on some other projects.  Most of the gunk came off just from the soak:

SemiCleanCases (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

SemiCleanCases (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

I don’t want to clean these any more at this point because I need to turn these cases into “Hybrid” cases.  I bought this drill bit a while ago and finally have a use for it.  The first part is 15mm in diameter and is used as a guide for the cutting part of the bit which is 17mm in diameter:

drillbiit (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

drillbiit (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

Took off a little at a time:

HybridCasesStarted

(click picture to enlarge)

HybridCasesFirstCut

(click picture to enlarge)

HybridCasesSecondCut

(click picture to enlarge)

Almost there:

HybridCasesThirdCut

(click picture to enlarge)

Done:

HybridCasesDone2

(click picture to enlarge)

The material that was removed from the first case:

HybridCasesShavings

(click picture to enlarge)

Other case done:

HybridCasesDone

(click picture to enlarge)


After many months of not working on this engine, I’m finally getting back at it.  Before I do the final clean-up of the cases, I wanted to do a couple of things.  First item was making the crank seals serviceable without having to split the cases. Details are HERE.

Before:

ClutchSideSealLipRemoval (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

After:

ClutchSideSealLipRemoval (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

Slight bevel on the edges to help the seal start properly:

SealBevel

(click picture to enlarge)

Other side, before:

CaseMachining (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

during:

CaseMachining (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

Almost there:

CaseMachining (7)

(click picture to enlarge)

Done with another slight bevel:

CaseMachining (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

CaseSealAfter (2)

(click picture to enlarge)


I needed to strip the cylinder to send it off to get replated.  I always seem to run into at least one stud that is frozen in place when dealing with a used cylinder.  This time I got two!

two stuck studs

(click picture to enlarge)

One came out with just a little more effort, but this one was really stuck in there.

single stuck stud

(click picture to enlarge)

After a handful of heat/PB Blaster treatments, it finally started moving.  I was starting to get concerned that I would snap the stud.

stud removed

(click picture to enlarge)

This always seems to need heat to break loose as well:

plug

(click picture to enlarge)

The cylinder is supposed to get there January 2nd.

readytoship

Great work and quick turnaround, details HERE.

PowerSealRePlate (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

PowerSealRePlate (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

PowerSealRePlate (8)

(click picture to enlarge)

PowerSealRePlate (3)

(click picture to enlarge)


I was reading this article and noticed that case lapping had come up several times.  Since I had the cases apart I thought I would check that out.  Sure enough, when I put them together and held up the crank area of the cases to a light, I could see areas where light was shining through.

400 grit wet/dry and a small piece of stone counter top:

case lapping (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

This area in particular was bad.  The shiny part that the arrows are pointing to are the factory machining on the mating surface.  The dull part on the other side of the arrows is what has been wet sanded.

case-midway

(click picture to enlarge)

After the 2nd sheet of 400 grit was getting beat up, I thought I would stop.  Not perfect, but so much better than before.  I could have kept going, but figured I was just increasing my chances of screwing something else up.

case-after

(click picture to enlarge)

Remains of the lapping process:

case lapping (1)

(click picture to enlarge)


While the cases are still dirty, I want to match them to the cylinder.  While I have the grinder out, I will do some clean-up of the cylinder as well.  Details are HERE.

I looked at 3 sets of matching cases and they are all like this:

CaseMismatch

(click picture to enlarge)

Without factoring in the cylinder, this is the difference with just the factory gasket:

CaseGasketDifference

(click picture to enlarge)

With the cylinder bolted to each case half, here are some opportunities to improve airflow.

RearPort (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

Before:

LeftCaseRearPort

(click picture to enlarge)

After:

LeftCaseRearPort

(click picture to enlarge)

Before:

LeftCylnderFlaw

(click picture to enlarge)

After:

LeftCylnderFlawRemoved

(click picture to enlarge)

The blue arrow is pointing to what was removed to match-up the other case half and cylinder.  The red is how much the other side is off:

RearPort (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

If you scribe a line where the case and cylinder meet:

LeftCaseTransfer

(click picture to enlarge)

This is how much they are off:

mismatch

(click picture to enlarge)

After:

finalgrindingcase

(click picture to enlarge)

One more spot:

badairflow

(click picture to enlarge)

220CylinderCaseAfter

(click picture to enlarge)

MiscCaseMatching (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

MiscCaseMatching (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

On to the cylinder.  I only want to remove the casting imperfections.   I have zero experience to start messing with the size and shape of the ports.

Everything the arrows are pointing to are casting flaws.  Those are just little ridges, walls, partitions – whatever you want to call them – that are disrupt airflow.

leftport-arrows

(click picture to enlarge)

Backside:

backsideport

(click picture to enlarge)

Same thing on the other side:

rightportbefore

(click picture to enlarge)

Without making the port larger and just removing the obstructions, I got this:

leftportafter

(click picture to enlarge)

rightportafter

(click picture to enlarge)

This is how it looked prior to going off to PowerSeal:

intakeafter

(click picture to enlarge)

Looks a bit nicer after the plating:

IntakeAfterPlating

(click picture to enlarge)

Removed some casting flaws here,

exhaustport

(click picture to enlarge)

And here:

KIPSportbefore

(click picture to enlarge)

And that is the extent of my grinding work to the cylinder and cases.


Circling back to the crank seal modifications.  This is me staying consistent with going over board on a project.  I developed the HBR Crank Seal Retainer System model 392 (patent pending), or HBR-CSRS-392 for short.  More pictures are HERE:

Clutch side:

FinalVersion

(click picture to enlarge)

ClutchSideRetainer-Channel

(click picture to enlarge)

RetainerClutchSideBefore (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

RetainerClutchSideInstalled (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

RetainerClutchSideInstalled (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

Flywheel side:

FlywheelRetainer (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

FlywheelRetainer (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

RetainerFlywheelSideInstalled (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

RetainerFlywheelSideInstalled (5)

(click picture to enlarge)


Now I can finally clean the cases:

Soda blasting (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

Soda blasting (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

Soda blasting (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

Soda blasting (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

Soda blasting (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

One large box of baking soda later:

Soda blasting (7)

(click picture to enlarge)

Working on dissolving all the baking soda on hot water with Dawn:

Soda blasting (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

I had to go back and rinse out some of the blind bolt holes again, they were packed with baking soda.

casecleaning (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

casecleaning (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

Finally clean and put them in the oven at 225 degrees to speed up the drying process.

casecleaning (1)

(click picture to enlarge)


Final tweaking of the HBR crank, more pictures HERE:

Against what was specified in the manual, I measured as far out as I could go.

finalcranktrue (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

Minimal area to work with here:

finalcranktrue (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

As long as you don’t laterally move the crank, easier to get a reading on the flywheel side:

finalcranktrue (7)

(click picture to enlarge)

With the indicators at the extremes, I was just under .001″ on the flywheel side,  The “standard” from the manual is .03mm or .0012”, but that is measured close to where the bearings are positioned.

Putting the indicators closer, but still a little farther out from what is in the manual, I could barely see them move:

finalcranktrue (1)

(click picture to enlarge)


Cleaning up the crank and transmission.  I really like cleaning up the crank in this container because you can easily and quickly rotate it just by grabbing the connecting rod.  I want to make sure that nothing got into the bearing during the truing process:

partswasher (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

Works well on the transmission:

partswasher (5)

(click picture to enlarge)


All the bearings and misc parts to completely rebuild the bottom end:

bottomendrebuildparts

MooseRebuildKit


 

The big day, time to get the bottom end put together. Starting with a new piece of cardboard:

220BottomEnd1

(click picture to enlarge)

I like to center the crank in the cases.  Setting the crank inside the cases and getting the gap:

220Bottemend2

(click picture to enlarge)

So there is my target:

220BottomEnd3

(click picture to enlarge)

With completely stripped cases, I needed to get the bearings installed.  In they go:

220BottomEnd4

(click picture to enlarge)

I put all the bearings in the freezer the night before.  Sprayed them with WD40:

220BottomEnd9

(click picture to enlarge)

With just freezer temperatures, the crank bearings go in with no problems, but in the past I couldn’t get any of the other bearings to drop in.  So I thought I would see if some dry ice would help that:

220BottomEnd5

(click picture to enlarge)

I broke the piece in half and then put everything minus the crank bearings on the first piece:

220BottomEnd6

(click picture to enlarge)

Then the other piece of dry ice sandwiches those bearings:

220BottomEnd7

(click picture to enlarge)

Even though the freezer temps would be fine, I put the crank bearings on top:

220BottomEnd8

(click picture to enlarge)

30 minutes later, I started seeing what, if any, difference the dry ice makes.  Crank bearings go in no problems:

200BottomEnd10

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd12

(click picture to enlarge)

How quickly they frost up.  I like to put the cases back in the oven to warm the bearings up and get rid of the condensation:

220BottomEnd13

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd11

(click picture to enlarge)

The big bearing on the left dropped in, but all the others didn’t.  I had to press those in:

220BottomEnd17

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd19

(click picture to enlarge)

While I’m letting the cases cool, I replaced this transmission bearing:

220BottomEnd14

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd16

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd15

(click picture to enlarge)

The rest of the bearings installed:

220BottomEnd20

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd21

(click picture to enlarge)

I guess I’d rather use too much loctite than not enough.  I usually put some on the threads on the bolt and a drop or two on the threads in the hole.  That way the loctite doesn’t “wipe-off” as the bolt threads into the hole.  A q-tip or a twisted pieces of paper towel takes care of the excess.

220BottomEnd22

(click picture to enlarge)

Ready for the transmission:

220BottomEnd23

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd24

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd25

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd26

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd27

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd28

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd29

(click picture to enlarge)

Made sure that washer was still there:

220BottomEnd30

(click picture to enlarge)

I will be using the “heated slug” method to put this bottom end together.  I’m following the same process as I have in my video:

The key is to make sure the cases come together with no hang-ups.  New dowels make that much easier . . .

220BottomEnd31

(click picture to enlarge)

Putting the cases together with a few case bolts.  This serves two purposes.  First it tests to make sure the cases slide together with minimal resistance:

220BottomEnd32

(click picture to enlarge)

And it gives you a chance to shift through the gears to make sure everything operates correctly.  If you didn’t install the transmission correctly, super easy to correct it now compared to when the crank is installed and the cases are together:

220BottomEnd33

(click picture to enlarge)

Heating up the inner race with the HBR heated crank installer (HBR-HCI):

220BottomEnd35

(click picture to enlarge)

And with feeler gauges set, the crank drops right in:

220BottomEnd36

(click picture to enlarge)

I bought the dry ice for another part of this installation.  I’ve had it happen once or twice where something got hung-up and I didn’t get the cases together.  Not the end of the world, but a pain.  So I thought that by cooling down the bearing surface of the crank I would give myself a little bit of extra clearance.  Using a bag of ice would be easy, but it would be messy.  The dry ice was the way to go.  I started pre-cooling the bearing area like this:

220BottomEnd37

(click picture to enlarge)

While I was re-heating the HBR-HCI, I cleaned the mating surfaces several times with acetone and then coated both case halves with Yamabond 4. I’ve found using a brush goes pretty quickly and keeps me from putting on too much:

220BottomEnd39

(click picture to enlarge)

At this point i the process I can’t take too many pictures because everything comes together rather quickly.  In this picture, I have some dry ice against the bearing surface of the crank, the HBR-HCI is expanding the inner race of the crank bearing and I’ve just put Yamabond on both case halves.

220BottomEnd38

(click picture to enlarge)

I removed the dry ice, wiped off the condensation, removed the HBR-HCI and then installed the left case.   The case literally just dropped right on.  It went on so easy I initially wasn’t sure it was even fully seated in place.  That dry ice really made it go easy.

220BottomEnd40

(click picture to enlarge)

After installing and torquing the 11 case bolts, the bottom end is together:

220BottomEnd41

(click picture to enlarge)

220BottomEnd42

(click picture to enlarge)

Strange to see a KDX engine sitting like this without crank seals.

Exactly what I wanted to see.  A small but continuous line of squeeze out between the case halves:

220bottomendsqueezeout

(click picture to enlarge)

Lubing up the bottom end while it sits and waits for the rest of the engine build:

lube220bottomend

(click picture to enlarge)

I will drain out the excess before I put the top end on:

lube220bottomend2

(click picture to enlarge)


Putting some attention o the cylinder.  I did a quick check and the left KIPS bore didn’t have too much build-up from the plating process.  But there was room for improvement.

220borecleanup (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

I will be using the HBR Power Valve Bore Resurfacer, or HBR-PVBR to clean-up the bore:

220borecleanup (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

Starting with some 320 grit sandpaper:

220borecleanup (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

Move it in and out of the bore while spinning it with the drill:

220borecleanup (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

220borecleanup (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

You don’t want to get carried away and make the diameter of the bore too large.  It is best to do a little at a time and test.  Final clean-up was with 400 grit wet/dry:

220borecleanup (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

 


Wiseco calls for a minimum ring end gap of .0108″.  The .011″ feeler fits perfect, no need for filing:

ring-end gap

(click picture to enlarge)


Installing the studs.  A little bit of anti-seize.  Make sure to install the flat-bottom end of the stud in the case, leaving the rounded end for the nuts:

InstallingCaseStuds (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

All four started, getting the first set to proper height/depth:

InstallingCaseStuds (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

Three done, last one:

InstallingCaseStuds (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

Will need to do a little bit of trimming on the stock base gasket:

InstallingCaseStuds (2)

(click picture to enlarge)


Cleaned up the KIPS:

CleaningKIPS (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

PolishedKIPS (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

PolishedKIPS (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

And then gave the cylinder a final bath in preparation for installing the KIPS:

220CylinderFinalClean

(click picture to enlarge)


Installing the KIPS

Seals first:

220KIPS (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

Getting the main valve in:

220KIPS (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (7)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (8)

(click picture to enlarge)

Installing exhaust valves, right valve on right:

220KIPS (9)

(click picture to enlarge)

Coat the valves up in straight premix:

220KIPS (11)

(click picture to enlarge)

Drop them in the cylinder, it doesn’t matter right now how they are positioned:

220KIPS (10)

(click picture to enlarge)

Grease up the o-ring on the right exhaust rod:

220KIPS (12)

(click picture to enlarge)

Insert the rod in the cylinder:

220KIPS (14)

(click picture to enlarge)

Once the exhaust rod is fully inserted, lift up the valve and rotate until the marks are timed correctly then drop it back down:

220KIPS (13)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (15)

(click picture to enlarge)

Same process for the left side, except no grease because there is no o-ring.  Just straight premix on the exhaust rod:

220KIPS (18)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (19)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (20)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (21)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (22)

(click picture to enlarge)

Install the main valve lever:

220KIPS (23)

(click picture to enlarge)

More straight premix on the center shaft:

220KIPS (24)

(click picture to enlarge)

Slide it in and align the marks on the right side:

220KIPS (25)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (26)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (27)

(click picture to enlarge)

Drop the left exhaust gear on with the marks aligned:

220KIPS (28)

(click picture to enlarge)

More loctite on the nut:

220KIPS (30)

(click picture to enlarge)

Some anti-seize to make removal easier next time:

220KIPS (31)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

More anti-seize.  I try to do that whenever steel and aluminum come in contact with each other:

220KIPS (33)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (34)

(click picture to enlarge)

2 wraps of teflon tape:

220KIPS (35)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPS (36)

(click picture to enlarge)

With the cylinder basically done, time to go back to the bottom end.


Finally time to install the crank seals and the HBR-CSRS #392.

220CrankSeals (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

Flywheel side first:

220CrankSeals (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

Seal started:

220CrankSeals (7)

(click picture to enlarge)

Seal fully seated:

220CrankSeals (8)

(click picture to enlarge)

Red loctite and double-nutted:

220CrankSeals (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

Flywheel side HBR-CSRS #392 installed:

220CrankSeals (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

Clutch side next:

220CrankSeals (9)

(click picture to enlarge)

Seal started:

220CrankSeals (10)

(click picture to enlarge)

Seal fully seated:

220CrankSeals (11)

(click picture to enlarge)

Before I can install the clutch side HBR-CSRS #392, I need to get some longer bolts to compensate for the HBR-CSRS #392.  A quick trip to my collection of metric bolts:

220CrankSeals (12)

(click picture to enlarge)

Here we go:

220CrankSeals (13)

(click picture to enlarge)

Making sure these don’t come out:

220CrankSeals (15)

(click picture to enlarge)

220CrankSeals (16)

(click picture to enlarge)

220CrankSeals (17)

(click picture to enlarge)

Clutch side HBR-CSRS #392 installed:

220CrankSeals (1)

(click picture to enlarge)


 

Ready to bolt the cylinder on.  Trim up an OEM base gasket:

220basegasket (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

220basegasket (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

220basegasket (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

 

I always make sure I have an extra set of circlips when installing a piston.  I’ve had one too many shoot across the room and then have to spend way too much time looking for it – that is if I can even find it.  They are cheap and can save a lot of time.

220PistonInstall (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

Installing one circlip with the piston on the table.  Circlip started:

220PistonInstall (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

I found that my 3/8″ to 1/4″ adapter is the perfect fit to seat the circlip:

220PistonInstall (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

220PistonInstall (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

Fully seated:

220PistonInstall (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

Bearing installed and lubed with straight premix:

220PistonInstall (7)

(click picture to enlarge)

Piston on:

220PistonInstall (8)

(click picture to enlarge)

Circlip started:

220PistonInstall (9)

(click picture to enlarge)

220PistonInstall (10)

(click picture to enlarge)

Circlip fully seated:

220PistonInstall (11)

(click picture to enlarge)

Rings on:

220PistonInstall (12)

(click picture to enlarge)

Cylinder installed and torqued to spec:

220PistonInstall (13)

(click picture to enlarge)

220PistonInstall (1)

(click picture to enlarge)


A few miscellaneous items.

Brand new output shaft collar:

200OutputShaft (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

New o-rings as well:

200OutputShaft (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

New seal installed in the case:

200OutputShaft (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

Packing tape on the output shaft:

200OutputShaft (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

Slide the o-rings on:

200OutputShaft (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

New sprocket as well
200OutputShaft (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

sprocketon

(click picture to enlarge)

Greased gasket:

220FrontKIPSCover (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

Cover installed:

220FrontKIPSCover (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

Head studs with anti-seize:

DSC09417

(click picture to enlarge)

KDX220headstudsinstalled

(click picture to enlarge)

I’ve seen a few of these gaskets get so brittle that the center support breaks off:

SideKIPSCover (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

So let’s just take care of it now:

SideKIPSCover (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

SideKIPSCover (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

Gasket greased up and resonator cover installed along with head studs:

220PartiallyFinished (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

220PartiallyFinished (1)

(click picture to enlarge)


Well that isn’t going to work:

Dammit

(click picture to enlarge)


Back on track with the correct head gasket:

220CylinderHead (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

I will be using a stock 220 head for now. I have a spare 220 head that has some scratches that will be sent to RB Designs later on:

220CylinderHead (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

Head on, torqued to spec and a new plug installed:

220CylinderHead (2)

(click picture to enlarge)


Installing some new seals and gaskets:

CylinderHeadOutlet (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

CylinderHeadOutlet (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

CylinderHeadOutletInstalled

(click picture to enlarge)

MiscSealsGaskets (9)

(click picture to enlarge)

MiscSealsGaskets (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

MiscSealsGaskets (8)

(click picture to enlarge)

MiscSealsGaskets (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

kickstartseal

(click picture to enlarge)

MiscSealsGaskets (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

More grease on the gasket:

MiscSealsGaskets (7)

(click picture to enlarge)

MiscSealsGaskets (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

Another new seal:

MiscSealsGaskets (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

MiscSealsGaskets (4)

(click picture to enlarge)


 

A quick disassembly and clean-up of the governor:

Governor (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

Governor (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

GovernorClearance

(click picture to enlarge)


 

I ordered a new governor lever just because of some of the pictures I’ve seen of the damage a broken one can cause:

GovernorLever (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

Glad I did because this one was starting to show some wear:

GovernorLever (8)

(click picture to enlarge)

GovernorLever (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

New one installed:

NewGovernorLever

(click picture to enlarge)


Kick starter assembly cleaned-up and ready to go:

Kickstarterspring (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

Can’t forget that thin washer:

Kickstarterspring (2)

(click picture to enlarge)


Ready for the clutch:

220ReadyForClutch

(click picture to enlarge)

220ClutchInstall (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

Got some new OEM springs:

220ClutchInstall (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

220ClutchInstall (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

Testing heavy wedges and silver springs:

EXPHeavyWedgesSilverSprings (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

Clutch installed:

220ClutchInstall (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

Now to tighten down the clutch, primary gear and flywheel nuts.  Using this special flywheel holder:

220TightenClutchCrankFlywheelNuts (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

All nuts torqued to spec:

220ClutchInstalled

(click picture to enlarge)

Dry fitting the engine cover to make sure the shifter, kickstarter and KIPS governor and water pump all fit and line up correctly:

220CoverDryFit

(click picture to enlarge)

With everything fitting correctly, grease the gasket and bolt it in place:

220SideCoverOn

(click picture to enlarge)

Clutch cover next:

220ClutchCoverOn (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

220ClutchCoverOn (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

One last alignment of this KIPS gear:

220KIPSGearAlignment (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

Some blue loctite and torque to spec:

220KIPSGearAlignment (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

220KIPSGearAlignment (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

 

220BuildDone (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

220BuildDone (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

I need to do something about that flywheel cover.

220BuildDone (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

220BuildDone (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

I’m officially calling this 220 build done. The last few things like the kickstarter, shifter, etc will be put on once the engine is back in the bike.

 

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s