Harold Bawlzangya Racing

Modifications

One EXP conversion done, working on two more

The parts needed to make a few Rekluse conversions:

expparts

One is done and out the door today.  Just waiting on a few parts to finish the others.

conversionoutthedoor


NoToil comparison

After using the FilGuard filter I bought a while ago, I wasn’t that impressed.  But to be fair it was exceptionally dusty and the dust was so fine that it lingered in the air a long time.

Back when I did my air filter test, the NoToil filter performed very well.  Thinking that all NoToil filters where the same, I ordered one of the pre-oiled ones:

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Right out of the bag I was surprised:

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Years ago I used NoToil oil but had oil settle to the bottom of the filter and drip in the airbox.  I thought it was just be over-oiling, but I read complaints from others as well.  I stopped using it.  I am certain the machine that applies the oil in the factory is putting on the bare minimum, so I wasn’t expecting to see it settle out in the bag.

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Without opening the inner bag, the filter material itself looked different than the one I tested years ago:

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I went into the other room and turned the desklamp over:

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I wasn’t liking what I was seeing:

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I called RockyMountain up and got my return authorization for the pre-oiled filters I bought.  A quick check on eBay and I found a non-oiled NoToil filter.  A few days later this is what I received:

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A quick side-by-side and you can easily tell that the foam isn’t the same between the two:

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Nothing special about the sealing surface like on the Moose filters:

notoilcomparison-1

Now this is what I was looking for:

notoilcomparison-8

Seems like you give up quite a bit for the convenience of not having to oil the filter.


Image

First of several Rekluse EXP modifications

ClutchMods (1)

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Letting the oil flow

As I’m putting the 220 together, this was a good time to modify the clutch hub I have been using.  One of the used YZ clutches I bought a while ago came with a Hinson hub.  That hub had a lot of big oil holes in it:

YZHub

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The stock hub has 4 small holes:

HubOilHolesBefore

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So without going too crazy, I went from 4 small holes to 16 larger ones:

HubOilsHolesAfter

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That is more like it

220CylinderHead (1)

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Looks like I won’t be needing to hand-cut any gaskets for a little while now:

220TopEndGaskets

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HBR-CSRS #392 installed

More pictures HERE:

 

220CrankSeals (5)

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220CrankSeals (8)

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220CrankSeals (4)

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220CrankSeals (9)

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220CrankSeals (11)

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220CrankSeals (2)

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GovernorClearance

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Cleaning the KIPS

I had some of this cleaner that I was looking to get rid of so I thought I would try it on the KIPS parts.  Started soaking just this part:

CleaningKIPS (3)

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Then added some more and let them sit overnight.  It got off a lot of the gunk,

CleaningKIPS

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but it didn’t get all of the heavy carbon build-up:

CleaningKIPS (4)

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CleaningKIPS (5)

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CleaningKIPS (8)

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CleaningKIPS (9)

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I went to a fine wire wheel and had to work to get this stuff off:

CleaningKIPS (10)

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Soaked the rest of the KIPS in more of the combustion cleaner and they came out pretty clean:

CleaningKIPS (6)

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CleaningKIPS (7)

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In time we’ll see how well the carbon does/doesn’t stick to the more polished surfaces.  If I was going to polish this correctly, I would have had to have sanded out more of the metal to get rid of the imperfections for a nice surface.  But I didn’t want to remove metal and screw with the tolerances of the parts.  So all of the polishing was done with a buffing wheel.  Not a mirror finish, but it should be a bit “slipperier” than it was before:

PolishedKIPS (1)

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PolishedKIPS (2)

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A final clean-up in acetone and all ready to install:

CleaningKIPS (1)

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220 KIPS bore clean-up

It is not uncommon for some excess plating to buildup inside the bore of the KIPS system when the cylinder gets replated.  The left side isn’t a problem, but the right side that uses the o-ring on the exhaust rod can cause binding.  Removing the o-ring is not the proper fix.

I kept the old o-ring on and tested the cylinder to see how much resistance was on the rod.  I didn’t want to tear up the new o-ring.

220borecleanup (2)

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Not too bad, but it could be better.  Featuring the HBR Power Valve Bore Resurfacer, or HBR-PVBR for short.  Made from the highest quality materials, machined to the tightest of tolerances:

220borecleanup (3)

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I started with some 320 grit wet/dry sandpaper:

220borecleanup (4)

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220borecleanup (6)

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220borecleanup (5)

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220borecleanup (1)

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I moved the HBR-PVBR in and out of the bore several times while running the drill.  I checked the exhaust rod for proper operation.  I finished the process with 400 grit wet/dry sandpaper.   The rod moves smoothly with no hang-ups or unnecessary resistance.

 


Got the bottom end of the 220 put together

More pictures and details HERE.

casecleaning (1)

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220BottomEnd4

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220BottomEnd5

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220BottomEnd6

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200BottomEnd10

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220BottomEnd12

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220BottomEnd14

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220BottomEnd21

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220BottomEnd20

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220BottomEnd25

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220BottomEnd27

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220BottomEnd29

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220BottomEnd35

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220BottomEnd36

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220BottomEnd37

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220BottomEnd38

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220BottomEnd40

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220BottomEnd41

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220BottomEnd42

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Soda blasting cases

With all the modifications done to the cases, it is time to clean them up.   The Harbor Freight soda blaster works surprising well.

Soda blasting (2)

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Soda blasting (8)

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Soda blasting (6)

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Soda blasting (5)

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Soda blasting (4)

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Done with the soda,

Soda blasting (7)

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Soaking in hot, Dawn filled water to get rid of all the baking soda:

Soda blasting (1)

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Well I thought soaking them for a while and then using the handheld sink sprayer would have dissolved/removed all the baking soda.  But after speed drying the cases in the oven, I was wrong.  There was still baking soda in some of the blind bolt holes.

casecleaning (2)

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casecleaning (3)

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So back to the utility sink. This time I bought a tooth pick and poked it around in all the bolt holes while spraying it with the handheld sprayer.  Speed drying in the oven again and finally the cases are clean.

casecleaning (1)

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