Harold Bawlzangya Racing

Just the usual stuff

Table top


Almost got it running . . .

I got the engine/cradle/rear end back in the cart.


I thought I was going to get it running today until I did this:


Totally forgot I had this stuff

I was looking for some golf cart parts I had stashed away and forgot I had this stuff. 


Last ride pics

I found these today, taken from the last time we had the bikes out.


And there she goes . . .

I built the hybrid almost 7 years ago.  I’m sure I don’t even want to know how much time and money I have spent on that bike over the years.  The sale of that bike represents the end to my dirt bike riding.


One down, one to go

KDX was sold today:


A real gem

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Seal not fully seated:

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Yep, they tried to fix it with JB Weld:

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Saved the best for last:

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Finished up another EXP conversion

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Test fit:

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Rekluse EXP – KDX autoclutch conversion for sale

More details HERE.

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At least it was delivered

After several weird tracking updates, the clutch basket was finally delivered.  USPS has their hands full just geting eveything delivered right now, so I figured I was screwed on them finding a lost package. 

But this was sitting on the front steps this morning:


KDX /Rekluse conversion – soon to be for sale

As soon as the basket shows up, I can start this and have it for sale. 


Shipping do’s and don’ts

So I buy a Kawasaki FE290 golf cart engine over the summer, along with a muffler and 2 carbs.  All of that is easily 70 pounds, probably more.  This is how the ass clown ships it – single ply cardboard box with a few pieces of foam.  Here they are in order of un-boxing the engine:

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I wish I could say I made this up, but this is exactly how it looked when I opened the box!

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Nice how the carb and oil filter are right next to the side of the box.

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Wonder how that could have happened?

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Another nice touch – no significant packing between the clutch (which is attached to the crank) and the side of the box.

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After many emails back and forth, I got 1/2 of my money refunded.  The guy kept blaming UPS not handling the box carefully enough.  Simply amazing!

So this is how I box up an engine.  Remove all the parts that stick out or can be easily bent up:

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Plug up all openings:

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Remove clutch:

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Using a heavy duty, doubly wall box:

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Cut-up 3-4 pieces of cardboard and put them in the bottom:

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Bag the engine:

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Now the time consuming part, cutting up pieces of cardboard and fitting them around the engine to pack it in tightly:

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With the crank side, I cut out holes in the cardboard to slip over the exposed crankshaft.  That puts any pressure on the side of the engine and not the end of the crank:

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The engine is in there nice and tight:

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59 minutes later I’m finally done, box weighed in at 79 pounds. Next time I am going to use expanding foam.  That should save a lot of time and weight.

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DPI Charger

For most of the time 12+ years we owned the 1999 Club Car DS, it had the DPI Charger.  We always got 5+ years from our batteries and I gave the DPI charger part of the credit for that (keeping them watered properly didn’t hurt).

I just haven’t had the same confidence in the Club Car charger and OBC.  Plus having the OBC is just one more part that can fail at the wrong time and really screw up plans.  After selling a few more dirt bike parts, I had enough to get another DPI charger.

First step was getting rid of the OBC.

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Then I pulled the negative and signal wire from the loom:

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Pulled the grey signal wire out from the loom a littler further back:

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Cut and shrink-wrapped the signal wire:

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Next step was removing the plug on the negative charge port wire so it can connect directly the main negative:

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The last step is connecting the white and blue wires together.  Soldered with heat-shrink:

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Put everything back together and plugged in the DPI.

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Trying to stay ahead of the IAWPMA

This should keep me in good standing with the IAWPMA (Internet Alcohol Website Picture Monitoring Association) – for a little while at least.

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Enclosure installation

So the aluminum channel on the perimeter of the roof wasn’t going to make this as easy as I’d like.  There isn’t a lot of material above the slot to get the screw into:

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I installed the enclosure rails using the screws provided, but I wasn’t very confident that it would hold up long term.  I did a good job of getting the screw in the center of the channel on this one:

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But I didn’t catch this one my much:

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Considering that these enclosure rails are going to get some stress, I figured something a little more study was in order.  Brass toilet flange bolts will do the trick.  They fit perfectly in the channel.

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So the enclosure rails were supposed to be universal in that they had some rectangular and v notches cut in them that would supposedly clear most roof/support combinations.  It was strictly cosmetic, but the cutouts that didn’t even clear anything looked like a hack job to me.

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I added some aluminum flat stock to cover the cutouts, tightened down the nuts on the t-bolts and then installed some rivets on any of the visible screws holes I originally made.  I can live with the way it looks now.

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FE290 muffler

Deep inside the quiet and restrictive FE290 muffler:

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Just a few carts . . .

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Halogen vs. LED

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$636 worth of Trojans

Time to get those leaking crap batteries out of there.

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There are 4 bolts that hold the battery liner to the frame.  The two bolts  on the right were on the side of the liner that was acid free.  The bolt in the middle had been eaten away by battery acid.  Luckily for me it came out without any issues.  I am replacing all 4 with the stainless bolts on the right.

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I cleaned out the liner with baking soda and water.  All ready for new batteries.

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$636 later:

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Those carry straps make the job much easier and safer.

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Cables back on:

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Bought the batteries in October 2016 but they are stamped November 2016.

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48-12 volt reducer/converter installation

I didn’t have too many options on where to install my converter.  I finally decided to put it on the front side of the battery compartment.  I needed to remove this protrusion to get enough clearance between the converter and battery:

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I wound up having to remove some trim pieces to get to the backside of the battery liner to hold the nylon lock nuts in place:

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Converter in:

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This converter doesn’t have a power on lead, so I’m using a 48 volt relay to turn it off/on with the key.  Flyback diode installed:

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I also installed a unique key switch and then wired a signal wire for the relay.  The previous owner didn’t have a battery meter, so I put one of those in as well:

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Will I was doing some wiring, I also installed a dual 2.1 USB recepiticle:

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MCOR replacement

Of course I didn’t notice any problems with the accelerator, or Go pedal during the test drive.  But on my 30 minute drive home, the cart was acting a little funny.  Doing some reading on BuggiesGoneWild, the MCOR is a common problem.    2009 was an odd year in that Club Car tried a TPS system.  Luckily this cart already had the TPS-MCOR conversion performed:

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The cart has an MCOR2:

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David at Revolutiongolfcars.com got me a MCOR4 replacement next day:

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Slight difference between the two:

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Installed and the cart runs correctly now:

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Upgraded battery cables

I had saved the 2 gauge welding cable and lugs that I had left-over from the last time I had made cables.   Luckily I had enough to make an entire new set.

This small cable was one of the ones that was the hottest after the drive home.  Comparison of the old vs. new:

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Complete set installed.  Later I will cut-off the yellow heat shrink and will replace it with something better.

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I was expecting that I would need to install a stud to go through the OBC, but with a little silicone spray, the 2 gauge made it though:

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2009 Club Car Precedent

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It came with Walmart “Heavy duty Commercial” batteries.  They were overfilled and would leak acid at every charge.  These will need to go soon.

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After getting the cart home, I did a quick check on the cables and several were warmer than others.  Not surprising considering that the terminals were only crimped on.  I will address that in a little bit.

The PO also installed the lug nuts backwards:

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Over-application of anti-sieze:

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Lug nuts installed correctly and torqued to spec:

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Sold in 3 days

We bought this “reconditioned” 1999 Club Car almost 13 years ago.  It was time to freshen it up, unfortunately I didn’t take any before pictures.  My son used it for about a year to pull his lawn cutting equipment.  Here it is in action:

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Prepping the cowl for painting:

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Drove it around for a few weeks like this:

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After painting, drove it around for a few weeks with no roof or windshield.  That was a much different, and nicer in the summer at least, driving experience.  Walmart parking lot:

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I decided to try and sell it to see what kind of interest and price I could get for it.  Here are the pictures I used for the Craigslist ad:

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Brand new seat:

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New batter meter:

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New 48-12 volt converter to power lights and USB charger:

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New unique key:

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May 2016 batteries:

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DPI charger:

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480 amp controller, H/D solenoid, H/D forward/reverse switch:

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And the EMP 2 speed motor:

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It sold in 3 days to a neighbor down the street. It is strange to see it from time to time being driven by someone else.