Harold Bawlzangya Racing

Shortening throttle cable

The throttle cable I ordered with the Lectron just didn’t fit the Hybrid very well.  It was too long and I was concerned that it would get caught on a branch sometime.

The new cable had an extra section that served as another means of adjusting the cable slack.  By removing this section, the overall length was almost the same as the stock KX throttle cable.

ShortenCable (15)

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When I Google’d ways to shorten cables, there were a couple of different approaches.  I decided to go with the approach of soldering a “stop” to the end.  I’ve soldered stainless steel cable in the past, so I felt most comfortable with this approach.  It turns out the new cable had the stop soldered on anyway.

ShortenCable (7)

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Heating it up the stop slid right off:

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Now it was time to cut the cable to the right length.  I set the throttle housing adjuster approximately at the midway point so I had some leeway on both sides to make the final adjustments:

ShortenCable (8)

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With the throttle hooked up, I installed the cable on the carb and removed the slack from the cable:

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With the carb sitting on the bench, I was able to mark the cable where it needed to be cut:

ShortenCable (10)

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This is how much the cable was shortened:

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The first step in putting a new “stop” on the cut cable is to fray the ends a little.  With a proper solder job, the solder will wick up in to the cable anyway, but the fraying is just extra insurance that the “stop” isn’t going anywhere:

ShortenCable (1)

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The solder won’t stick to aluminum, so I drilled a small hole in a scrap piece the diameter I needed:

ShortenCable (2)

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This is the solder and flux I used:

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I cleaned the end of the cable with the flux.  Then I heated up the aluminum block and once it got up to temperature, I melted the solder into the hole I drilled.  I kept the heat on a few seconds more and then inserted the cable.  The most difficult part of the entire process was keeping the cable still and vertical until the block of aluminum cooled and the solder hardened.

Once I could put the propane torch down, I could take a picture of where I was at:

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After things cooled off, this is how the cable came out:

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A little clean-up with a file and a comparison with the original stop:

ShortenCable (5)

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And finally, the shortened cable in the slide:

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