Harold Bawlzangya Racing

Servicing swingarm, linkage and shock bearings – Day 3

Time to start working on the swingarm bearings.

The bushings were showing some wear . . .

WornComponents (3)

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The teflon side hasn’t worn much at all . . .

WornComponents (2)

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But the obvious wear was on the copper side.  Considering how soft copper is, it seems these held up well.  The last time I had the swingarm apart was in January 2011.  These teflon bearings haven’t worn much since then – January 2011 bearing pictures.

WornComponents (1)

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The last set of bushings were cut to length at a machine shop.  I don’t remember it costing too much, but it took a couple of days to get them back.  I had an idea of how I could do it myself.  First step is rough cutting the bushing with a cut-off wheel.  I was really generous with how much I left behind.

CuttingSwingarmBushing (2)

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And here is the bushing cut to size.  Perfect cut, both bushing exactly the same length.  One bushing took about 10 minutes to get to the target dimension, the other took about 15 minutes due to making a smaller cut with the cut-off wheel.

CuttingSwingarmBushing (1)

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CuttingSwingarmBushing (4)

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Now this is how I did it.  I used one of the old bearings and gorilla glued and clamped in wood.

BushingCutting (2)

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BushingCutting (3)

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Then I bolted my sliding vice and grinder to a piece of scrap plywood.  After clamping the bearing block in the vice, I aligned and then tightened down the vice.

BushingCutting (1)

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The bushing gets inserted into the bearing block and with a socket extension serving as a handle . . .

CuttingSwingarmBushing (6)

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I rotated and pushed the bushing towards the grinder until the bushing hit the bearing.  This provided a stop.  I initially set the vice so the bushings would be too long, and then I kept adjusting the vice until I got to the target length.  I wasn’t trying to cut the entire cross section of the bushing at once.  I set the vice up so just a part of the bushing was being cut.  This is where the rotating came in. . .

CuttingSwingarmBushing (7)

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CuttingSwingarmBushing (3)

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Finally able to start putting the rear end back together.  Starting with a clean work surface . . .

Starting

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I used a vice this time to install the swingarm bearings.  First step is to grease up the bearing and the inner part of the swingarm and get it started. . .

InstallingSwingarmBearing (2)

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I used a vice this time to seat the bearings.  A 24mm flat bottomed socket worked as the flat bottom would hit this lip and properly seat the bearing.

InstallingSwingarmBearing (1)

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InstallingSwingarmBearing (3)

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As far in as it will go with just the SS plate. . .

InstallingSwingarmBearing (4)

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Now with the 24mm socket . . .

InstallingSwingarmBearing (3)

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All done with seating the bearings.

InstallingSwingarmBearing (7)

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A little while later and everything is greased up and ready to install.

Done

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