Harold Bawlzangya Racing

HBR - Harold Bawlzangya Racing - HBR

Too much time on my hands . . . Or not enough sleep?

Latest

The $23 KDX-EXP clutch kit

So I thought I was getting a decent deal on a Tusk clutch kit for my KDX-EXP conversion:

CRFClutchKit

(click picture to enlarge)

CRFClutchKit2

(click picture to enlarge)

The package arrives, I open it up and see that the clutch kit has been opened.  I pull out the frictions and drives and notice that two of the frictions have already been exposed to oil and one of the steel plates has some rust on it.  So much for it being a new kit.

UsedNewClutchKit

(click picture to enlarge)

Long story short, the buyer refunds $15.00:

Clutch Refund

(click picture to enlarge)

I accepted the refund since I only need 5 of the frictions.

 

3 months post-surgery

Walking 5-7 miles a day and biking almost 10 miles a day.  Still now where close to being able to get on the dirt bike though.

3monthspostsurgery

Before and After

The before:

HipBefore (1)

HipBefore (2)

The after:

HipAfter

Crank Rebuild

My first attempt at rebuilding a two stroke crank.  I’m starting with this H-series KDX crank:

CrankRebuild (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

A few minutes with a fresh cut-off wheel on the angle grinder:

CrankRebuild (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

Remember to press the crank pin from the outside-to-inside.  You don’t want to press the crank pin out so the cut portion has to pass through the crank web:

CrankRebuild (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

Using a Pro-X (OEM) crank rebuild kit.  $58 on Amazon:

CrankRebuild (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

First step installing the crank pin:

CrankRebuild (7)

(click picture to enlarge)

CrankRebuild (8)

(click picture to enlarge)

Bearing and washers on:

CrankRebuild (9)

(click picture to enlarge)

Because I don’t have a nice jig that ensures nearly perfect alignment like the crank builders do, I pressed the other crank web on in steps.  Once I got it started, I put in on the v-blocks and made adjustments to get the run-out below .001″.  Because the crank pin wasn’t fully seated, these adjustments took very little force. I repeated this partial press/adjustment process a total of three times.  This is what the crank looked like after the 3rd press:

CrankRebuild (10)

(click picture to enlarge)

Final press:

CrankRebuild (11)

(click picture to enlarge)

Specs on side clearance:

CrankRebuild (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

CrankRebuild (13)

(click picture to enlarge)

CrankRebuild (12)

(click picture to enlarge)

A quick video showing my run-out during part of the process:

 

The 220 that wasn’t

I thought I finally found a 220:

220Engine

(click picture to enlarge)

Yeah, I wasn’t thinking that the 220 wasn’t made in 1996.  The seller realized this wasn’t a 220 either prior to shipping, so we worked out a good price and this showed up a few days later:

eBayKDXEngine (27)

eBayKDXEngine (28)

I was still hoping there was a mix-up and this was still a 220, but just another 200:

eBayKDXEngine (31)

Time to start tearing it apart and see why the bottom end “needs work”.

Always interesting to see what other owners to do to try to keep things running:

eBayKDXEngine (38)

This person really liked a lot of RTV:

eBayKDXEngine (37)

eBayKDXEngine (36)

eBayKDXEngine (35)

When in doubt, RTV plus the gasket:

eBayKDXEngine (39)

eBayKDXEngine (40)

eBayKDXEngine (41)

eBayKDXEngine (42)

KIPS is moving smoothly:

eBayKDXEngine (9)

eBayKDXEngine (7)

No need to keep dirt out of the engine:

eBayKDXEngine (11)

eBayKDXEngine (10)

eBayKDXEngine (12)

eBayKDXEngine (13)

Here is why the crank is locked solid:

eBayKDXEngine (14)

eBayKDXEngine (15)

eBayKDXEngine (17)

eBayKDXEngine (24)

Another example of a factory assembled crank that wasn’t centered:

eBayKDXEngine (19)

eBayKDXEngine (18)

Having the crank locked solid makes it easy to get the flywheel and crank gear off:

eBayKDXEngine (1)

eBayKDXEngine (5)

eBayKDXEngine (21)

eBayKDXEngine (22)

eBayKDXEngine (23)

eBayKDXEngine (25)

eBayKDXEngine

After I cleaned up the crank, I put it on the v-blocks and it was still in spec.  The side clearance was still in spec and no up/down movement in the big end bearing.  Hard to kill a KDX.

In looking everything over, all pieces of the engine are in good shape (except the cylinder of course) and it doesn’t look like this engine had too many hours on it.  It is unfortunate a lazy owner let the piston go too long and take out the engine.

I’m trying to decide if I should part everything out or do a complete rebuild????

One last warm weather ride

It was going to be near 70 and I decided that morning to get one more ride in before things got colder.  I pulled into Highland Park’s parking lot, got out of the truck and heard a hissing.  Sure enough, front tire was leaking:

HP 11.111.14 (31)

(click picture to enlarge)

I wasn’t sure if I was getting any bad luck out of the way in the parking lot or if it was just the beginning.  After getting the spare on, time to go riding.

I was in such a hurry to get going that morning, I forgot that I didn’t have my skidplate on.

HP 11.111.14 (12)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (4)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (7)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (8)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (9)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (10)

(click picture to enlarge)

Mostly dry, but I still found a little mud:

HP 11.111.14 (13)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (14)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (16)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (17)

(click picture to enlarge)

Several years ago the view from this lookout was great, not so much anymore:

HP 11.111.14 (18)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (19)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (20)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (21)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (22)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (23)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (25)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (26)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (27)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (28)

(click picture to enlarge)

Coming down this hill, if you blow this turn . . .

HP 11.111.14 (29)

(click picture to enlarge)

you’ll be going for a little ride down the side of the hill.

HP 11.111.14 (30)

(click picture to enlarge)

HP 11.111.14 (32)

(click picture to enlarge)

I didn’t think I got going fast enough to get bug splatter:

HP 11.111.14 (15)

(click picture to enlarge)

It looks like all of my bad luck was focused on the flat tire.  The worst thing that happened was this new dent.  I heard the dull thud as I was riding the trail.  I really like riding at HP, but it hasn’t been easy on my pipe.  All the dents in my pipe have come from riding here.

HP 11.111.14 (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

Back to the KX250 silencer

I am going to go back to the KX250 silencer, for a while at least.

First step is adding the spacer, like I did HERE.  This time I am going to go with aluminum.

KX250Silencer (1)

(click picture to enlarge)

I had to pry it apart just to get it started:

KX250Silencer (2)

(click picture to enlarge)

Then tapped it on the rest of the way:

KX250Silencer (3)

(click picture to enlarge)

KX250Silencer (5)

(click picture to enlarge)

KX250Silencer (6)

(click picture to enlarge)

Ready to go:

KX250Silencer (9)

(click picture to enlarge)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.